WORLD HOSPITAL DIRECTORY
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WORLD HOSPITAL DIRECTORY is the one and only largest database of hospitals around the world. There are over 35,000 plus records of hospitals across globe

WORLD HOSPITAL DIRECTORY has the World's largest online database of general, multispeciality, eye, dental, children, maternity, cardiac care, orthopedic, nephrology, neurology, diabetic, psychiatric, cancer, ENT, hospice, Rehabilitation, alternate medicine, veterinary hospitals across globe. Discover the complete list of hospitals available in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, rest of the world and online.


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1CEMIC
CEMIC
Category: General Hospitals
Argentina
South America, America
2Croydon Hospital (Tablelands HSD)
Croydon Hospital (Tablelands HSD)
Category: Mulispeciality Hospitals
Australia
Australia and New Zealand, Oceanic
3Regionaal Hospital Sint-Maria
Regionaal Hospital Sint-Maria
Category: Mulispeciality Hospitals
Belgium
Western Europe, Europe
4Bairro Passo D'areia Farmaconte Dist. Produtos Hospitalares Ltda.
Bairro Passo D'areia Farmaconte Dist. Produtos Hospitalares Ltda.
Category: Mulispeciality Hospitals
Brazil
South America, America
5BCIT - Technology Centre, Health Technology Research Group
BCIT - Technology Centre, Health Technology Research Group
Category: General Hospitals
Canada
North America, America

1.
Why Our Healthcare System Isnt Healthy
Why Our Healthcare System Isnt HealthyMost people are well aware that an estimated 45 million Americans currently do not have healthcare, but is the crisis simply the lack
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2.
Stopping Hospital Infections
Stopping Hospital InfectionsEach year hospitals end up killing twice as many people than automobiles, some 90,000 deaths in the United States. It is not from malpractice, i
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3.
Protect Yourself Against the Flu Vaccine!
Protect Yourself Against the Flu Vaccine!<br />
The vaccine industry insists that their vaccines against the flu serve as the key to a healthy winter. Although there has
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4.
Chinese Medicine
Chinese MedicineChinese Medicine, over 2000 years old, is an ancient form of medicine. Consisting of acupuncture, moxibustion (moxibustion - using material made up of
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5.
Medical Billing Specialist
Medical Billing SpecialistAs Pres. Bush was touring the Midwest, shortly before he was re-elected as President, and even after, he spoke of medical reform centering on
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6.
Nasonex And You: Breathe Easy, Not Sneezy
Nasonex And You: Breathe EasyWhile everybody else is wandering around enjoying the spring weather, are you hiding out in your hermetically-sealed house? Do you dread the star
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7.
Chronic Headaches and Pain Often Can Be Eliminated By A Special Dentist
Chronic Headaches Often Can Be Eliminated By A Special DentistDENVER ? Sometimes as Freud once said a good cigar is just a smoke. A headache, on the other hand, occas
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8.
Physicians, Chiropractors and Physical Therapist Agree on a New Treatment for Low Back Pain
New Treatment for Low Back Pain<br />
One of the most prevalent and difficult health conditions to treat in the physical medicine is low back pain. The difficulty in tre
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9.
Web Therapy: Enhancing Patient Communication with Web Access
Web Therapy: Enhancing Patient Communication with Web AccessAccording to Jennifer Lyons' chart, she's just a bad slip and fall who's lucky enough to be on her way to a full
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10.
Increasing Patient Care and Reducing Liability in Seven Simple Steps
Increasing Patient Care and Reducing Liability in Seven Simple StepsWhen an unconscious patient arrives in the ED, every hospital agrees that timely next of kin notificat
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11.
Cetyl Myristoleate Seperating Fact From Fiction
Cetyl Myristoleate Seperating Fact From FictionI am a strong believer in Cetyl Myristoleate for the treatment of arthritis. For the last three years I have been res
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12.
Medical Tests: What Does a Normal Range Mean?
Medical Tests: What Does a Normal Range Mean?We have a marvelous array of medical tests available to us. Many of them-typically blood-tests-even come with results expressed
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13.
CT and MRI Scans in Neurological Practice
CT and MRI Scans in Neurological Practice

Before computed tomographic (CT) scans became available in the 1970s, there was no good method for imaging the brain. The a
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14.
Alcohol Rehabilitation Centers - Take An Informed Decision
Alcohol Rehabilitation Centers - Take An Informed DecisionAlcohol rehabilitation centers in the United States offer a wide range of treatment programmes for your recovery f
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15.
Contact Lenses and Eye Glasses
Contact Lenses and Eye GlassesHow is Your Vision?
Notice friends getting contact lenses and pulling out eye glasses?

"What do you recommend?"

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16.
Death by Fluoride
Death by FluorideA wee bit of fluoride makes teeth and dentists happy, we're told. Dr. Happy Tooth's smiley face turns into a frown when his favorite decay buster is busted
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17.
10 Steps To Detoxification
10 Steps To DetoxificationTechnology. We live in a grand time of technological development. Computers, the Internet, cell phones, digital cameras and DVDs. But the human body h
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18.
New Surgical Treatment Options for Hernias
New Surgical Treatment Options for HerniasHernia repair is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide. In fact, there are over 600,000 hernia repa
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19.
Arthritis Pain Relief : FAQ
Arthritis Pain Relief : FAQA great place to begin taking charge of you arthritis pain relief and prevention planning is by making an appointment with your healthc
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20.
A Surgical Robot Fixes Heart in Brazil
a Surgical Robot Fixes Heart in BrazilBrazilian surgeons used a multi-armed robot to repair a hole in a woman's heart in the first operation of its kind in Latin Americ
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21.
Root Canal Therapy:FAQ
Root Canal Therapy:FAQOverview

A diseased or injured nerve use to mean that you were likely to lose a tooth. This is no longer the case thanks to root
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22.
ADHD - Are there Treatment Options?
ADHD - Are there Treatment Options?As an ADD coach I am often asked about the treatment options available for Attention Deficit Disorder. Generally when someone says "ADD" the f
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23.
7 Tips to Keep Your Fluid Down on Dialysis
7 Tips to Keep Your Fluid Down on DialysisAs any dialysis patient will tell you, keeping your fluid gain between dialysis sessions in check is not only important to your lon
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24.
Testosterone Therapy in XXI Century
Testosterone Therapy in XXI CenturyNowadays many people are familiar with the appellation of "low testosterone level". What does it mean? It mean that male body p
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25.
Stem Cell Research
Stem Cell ResearchHow To Buy Your Way Out Of An Early Death From An Incurable Disease.

How?... With private stem cell research, of course!?Stem cell research
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1.
Maharashtra woos medical tourists
Maharashtra woos medical touristsMany people from the developed world come to India for the rejuvenation promised by yoga and ayurvedic massage, but few consider it a de
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2.
Medical tourism: Need surgery, will travel
Maharashtra woos medical touristsA worldwide market

What's called medical tourism – patients going to a different country for either urgent or elective
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3.
Medical Tourism is Becoming a Huge Industry in India
Diatance LearningMany types of medical treatment in India cost a fraction of what they do in the United States and other Western nations, and citizens from these c
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4.
Medical tourism set to take off in a big way
Medical tourism set to take off in a big wayWith world class healthcare professionals, nursing care and treatment cost almost one-sixth of that in the developed
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5.
India eyeing share in medical tourism pie
India eyeing share in medical tourism pie A NICE blend of top-class medical expertise at attractive prices is helping a growing number of Indian corporate hospitals lure forei
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6.
Are we ready for medical tourism?
Are we ready for medical tourism? The private healthcare industry is quietly facilitating a revolution to enable India to emerge as a health destination. Yet there are the
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7.
Is medical tourism worth the risk?
Is medical tourism worth the risk?Thousands of Britons are heading abroad for cut-price treatment. We investigate the health tourism boom and asks if the benefits o
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8.
Package holiday surgery to beat NHS queue
Package holiday surgery to beat NHS queueA holiday firm is offering 'sun and surgery' package deals to India for patients tired of waiting for the NHS.

Th
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9.
Choosing the right weight loss surgery abroad
Choosing the right weight loss surgery abroadThe reluctance of public healthcare systems and health insurers to fund weight loss surgery means that more and more people are
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10.
The forgotten medical tourism destination
The forgotten medical tourism destinationAn article by medical tourism specialist, Ian Youngman, on one of the world’s leading destinations for medical travelers which seems
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11.
Why medical tourism needs facilitators
Why medical tourism needs facilitatorsFollowing our recent article on "How can patients judge quality in medical tourism?", Caroline Ratner spoke to Mike Silford, who run
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12.
How can patients judge quality in medical tourism?
How can patients judge quality in medical tourism?There's much discussion and hype around the medical tourism world about “quality”. Every hospital, clinic, healthcar
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13.
The importance of social media and the web in medical tourism
The importance of social media and the web in medical tourismMore than most other industries, medical tourism agencies and international patient departments rely heavily on t
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14.
Medical Tourism Destinations: Places That Top The Charts
Medical Tourism Destinations: Places That Top The ChartsMedical tourism is a popular trend among people in the US nowadays. Many Americans are moving abroad to get tr
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15.
Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery Option In Malaysia
Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery Option In MalaysiaMedical Tourism Malaysia is growing at an exponential growth factor. Its enjoying medical tourist from UK, Australia, New Zealand
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16.
Samitivej Medical Tourism, A Lucrative Business
Samitivej Medical Tourism, A Lucrative BusinessSamitivej Wins 2 Prestigious HMA Awards 2008 Path to Being the Largest Medical Tourism

Samitivej, a leading pri
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17.
Jordan pushes medical tourism industry
Jordan pushes medical tourism industryAfter establishing itself as a popular destination for medical care among Arabs in the Middle East, Jordan is now looking to attract more
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18.
Some Frequently Asked Questions about Medical Tourism
Some Frequently Asked Questions about Medical TourismWhat is the quality of care that I can expect? Most of the healthcare centers abroad such as hospitals clinics and diagnostic
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19.
Infertility Treatment in India
Infertility Treatment in IndiaInfertility is the inability to conceive a child by natural means. When a couple finds it difficult to conceive naturally, medication and spe
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20.
Medical Tourism Thailand
Medical Tourism ThailandThailand has been a popular holiday destination of the East which is now a popular medical tourism destination as well. The Thai medical service is on
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21.
Medical Tourism India
Medical Tourism IndiaA medical tourist in India can get the best of both worlds- excellent medical service from experts in the field of medicine and a splendid experience of a
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22.
Digitizing Medical Documents
Digitizing Medical DocumentsIt is a common fact that hospitals and doctors need a patient’s detailed medical history before treating them. But when you have travele
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23.
Roux-en-gastric bypass in India: An Overview
Roux-en-gastric bypass in India: An OverviewRoux-en-gastric bypass in India is very economical and affordable. Low cost but quality treatment attracts many patients of a
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24.
Need a dentist? Come to Croatia
Need a dentist? Come to Croatia



vaporizers



Croatia has decided to take
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25.
India offers hope for those too sick to wait
India offers hope for those too sick to waitEmerging into the teeming chaos of people, cows and honking vehicles outside Bangalore airport, retired teacher John Stauffer wonde
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Suicide or undetermined intent? A register-based study of signs of misclassification
Background: Several studies have concluded that some deaths classified as undetermined intent are in fact suicides, and it is common in suicide research in Europe to include these deaths. Our aim was to investigate if information on background variables would be helpful in assessing if deaths classified as undetermined intent should be included in the analyses of suicides. Methods: We performed a register study of 31,883 deaths classified as suicides and 9,196 deaths classified as undetermined intent in Sweden from 1987 to 2011. We compared suicide deaths with deaths classified as undetermined intent with regard to different background variables such as sex, age, country of birth, marital status, prior inpatient care for self-inflicted harm, alcohol and drug abuse, psychiatric inpatient care, and use of psychotropics. We also performed a multivariate analysis with logistic regression. Results: Our results showed differences in most studied background factors. Higher education was more common in suicides; hospitalization for self-inflicted harm was more common among female suicides as was prior psychiatric inpatient care. Deaths in foreign-born men were classified as undetermined intent in a higher degree and hospitalization for substance abuse was more common in undetermined intents of both sexes. Roughly 50% of both suicide and deaths classified as undetermined intent had a filled prescription of psychotropics during their last six months. Our multivariate analysis showed male deaths to more likely be classified as suicide than female: OR: 1.13 (1.07-1.18). The probability of a death being classified as suicide was also increased for individuals aged 15-24, being born in Sweden, individuals who were married, and for deaths after 1987-1992. Conclusion: By analyzing Sweden's unique high-validity population-based register data, we found several differences in background variables between deaths classified as suicide and deaths classified as undetermined intent. However, we were not able to clearly distinguish these two death manners. For future research we suggest, separate analyses of the two different manners of death.


Correction: Robust metrics for assessing the performance of different verbal autopsy cause assignment methods in validation studies
No description available


Redistribution of heart failure as the cause of death: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study
Background: Heart failure is sometimes incorrectly listed as the underlying cause of death (UCD) on death certificates, thus compromising the accuracy and comparability of mortality statistics. Statistical redistribution of the UCD has been used to examine the effect of misclassification of the UCD attributed to heart failure, but sex- and race-specific redistribution of deaths on coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in the United States has not been examined. Methods: We used coarsened exact matching to infer the UCD of vital records with heart failure as the UCD from 1999 to 2010 for decedents 55 years old and older from states encompassing regions under surveillance by the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, and North Carolina). Records with heart failure as the UCD were matched on decedent characteristics (five-year age groups, sex, race, education, year of death, and state) to records with heart failure listed among the multiple causes of death. Each heart failure death was then redistributed to plausible UCDs proportional to the frequency among matched records. Results: After redistribution the proportion of deaths increased for CHD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, hypertensive heart disease, and cardiomyopathy, P < 0.001. The percent increase in CHD mortality after redistribution was the highest in Mississippi (12%) and lowest in Maryland (1.6%), with variations by year, race, and sex. Redistribution proportions for CHD were similar to CHD death classification by a panel of expert reviewers in the ARIC study. Conclusions: Redistribution of ill-defined UCD would improve the accuracy and comparability of mortality statistics used to allocate public health resources and monitor mortality trends.


Application of disability-adjusted life years to predict the burden of injuries and fatalities due to public exposure to engineering technologies
Background: As a public safety regulator, the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) of Ontario, Canada predicts and measures the burden of injuries and fatalities as its primary means of characterizing the state of public safety and for decision-making purposes through the use of a simulation model. The paper proposes a simulation-based predictive model and the use of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) as a population health metric for the purposes of reporting, benchmarking, public safety decision-making, and organizational goal setting. The proposed approach could be viewed as advancement in the application of traditional population health metrics, used primarily for public health policy decisions, for the measurement and prediction of safety risks across a wide variety of engineering technologies to which the general public is exposed. Results: The proposed model is generic and applicable to a wide range of devices and technologies that are typically used by the general public. As an example, a measure of predicted risk that could result from the use of and exposure to elevating devices in the province of Ontario is presented in terms of the DALY metric. The predictions are further categorized in terms of the causal attribution of the risks for the purposes of identifying and focusing decision-making efforts. The results are also presented by taking into consideration factors such as near-misses or precursor events as termed in certain industries. Conclusions: The ability to predict potential health impacts has three significant advantages for a public safety regulator – external reporting, decision-making to ensure public safety, and organizational benchmarking. The application of the well-known Monte Carlo simulation has been proposed to predict the health impacts expressed in terms of DALYs. The practicality of the proposed ideas has been demonstrated through the application of the prediction model to characterizing and managing risks associated with elevating devices in the province of Ontario, Canada.


Cigarette smoking prevalence in US counties: 1996-2012
Background: Cigarette smoking is a leading risk factor for morbidity and premature mortality in the United States, yet information about smoking prevalence and trends is not routinely available below the state level, impeding local-level action. Methods: We used data on 4.7 million adults age 18 and older from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 1996 to 2012. We derived cigarette smoking status from self-reported data in the BRFSS and applied validated small area estimation methods to generate estimates of current total cigarette smoking prevalence and current daily cigarette smoking prevalence for 3,127 counties and county equivalents annually from 1996 to 2012. We applied a novel method to correct for bias resulting from the exclusion of the wireless-only population in the BRFSS prior to 2011. Results: Total cigarette smoking prevalence varies dramatically between counties, even within states, ranging from 9.9% to 41.5% for males and from 5.8% to 40.8% for females in 2012. Counties in the South, particularly in Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia, as well as those with large Native American populations, have the highest rates of total cigarette smoking, while counties in Utah and other Western states have the lowest. Overall, total cigarette smoking prevalence declined between 1996 and 2012 with a median decline across counties of 0.9% per year for males and 0.6% per year for females, and rates of decline for males and females in some counties exceeded 3% per year. Statistically significant declines were concentrated in a relatively small number of counties, however, and more counties saw statistically significant declines in male cigarette smoking prevalence (39.8% of counties) than in female cigarette smoking prevalence (16.2%). Rates of decline varied by income level: counties in the top quintile in terms of income experienced noticeably faster declines than those in the bottom quintile. Conclusions: County-level estimates of cigarette smoking prevalence provide a unique opportunity to assess where prevalence remains high and where progress has been slow. These estimates provide the data needed to better develop and implement strategies at a local and at a state level to further reduce the burden imposed by cigarette smoking.


Measuring socioeconomic status in multicountry studies: results from the eight-country MAL-ED study
Background: There is no standardized approach to comparing socioeconomic status (SES) across multiple sites in epidemiological studies. This is particularly problematic when cross-country comparisons are of interest. We sought to develop a simple measure of SES that would perform well across diverse, resource-limited settings. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 800 children aged 24 to 60 months across eight resource-limited settings. Parents were asked to respond to a household SES questionnaire, and the height of each child was measured. A statistical analysis was done in two phases. First, the best approach for selecting and weighting household assets as a proxy for wealth was identified. We compared four approaches to measuring wealth: maternal education, principal components analysis, Multidimensional Poverty Index, and a novel variable selection approach based on the use of random forests. Second, the selected wealth measure was combined with other relevant variables to form a more complete measure of household SES. We used child height-for-age Z-score (HAZ) as the outcome of interest. Results: Mean age of study children was 41 months, 52% were boys, and 42% were stunted. Using cross-validation, we found that random forests yielded the lowest prediction error when selecting assets as a measure of household wealth. The final SES index included access to improved water and sanitation, eight selected assets, maternal education, and household income (the WAMI index). A 25% difference in the WAMI index was positively associated with a difference of 0.38 standard deviations in HAZ (95% CI 0.22 to 0.55). Conclusions: Statistical learning methods such as random forests provide an alternative to principal components analysis in the development of SES scores. Results from this multicountry study demonstrate the validity of a simplified SES index. With further validation, this simplified index may provide a standard approach for SES adjustment across resource-limited settings.


Using maximum weight to redefine body mass index categories in studies of the mortality risks of obesity
Background: The high prevalence of disease and associated weight loss at older ages limits the validity of prospective cohort studies examining the association between body mass index (BMI) and mortality. Methods: I examined mortality associated with excess weight using maximum BMI—a measure that is robust to confounding by illness-induced weight loss. Analyses were carried out on US never-smoking adults ages 50-84 using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (1988-1994 and 1999-2004) linked to the National Death Index through 2006. Cox models were used to estimate hazard ratios for mortality according to BMI at time of survey and at maximum. Results: Using maximum BMI, hazard ratios for overweight (BMI, 25.0-29.9 kg/m2), obese class 1 (BMI, 30.0-34.9 kg/m2) and obese class 2 (BMI, 35.0 kg/m2 and above) relative to normal weight (BMI, 18.5-24.9 kg/m2) were 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-1.84), 1.67 (95% CI, 1.15-2.40), and 2.15 (95% CI, 1.47-3.14), respectively. The corresponding hazard ratios using BMI at time of survey were 0.98 (95% CI, 0.77-1.24), 1.18 (95% CI, 0.91-1.54), and 1.31 (95% CI, 0.95-1.81). The percentage of mortality attributable to overweight and obesity among never-smoking adults ages 50-84 was 33% when assessed using maximum BMI. The comparable figure obtained using BMI at time of survey was substantially smaller at 5%. The discrepancy in estimates is explained by the fact that when using BMI at time of survey, the normal category combines low-risk stable-weight individuals with high-risk individuals that have experienced weight loss. In contrast, only the low-risk stable-weight group is categorized as normal weight using maximum BMI. Conclusions: Use of maximum BMI reveals that estimates based on BMI at the time of survey may substantially underestimate the mortality burden associated with excess weight in the US.


Cancer trends in Lebanon: a review of incidence rates for the period of 2003¿2008 and projections until 2018
Background: The analysis of cancer incidence trends is essential to health care planning. The aim of this study is to examine variations in cancer incidence rates in Lebanon between 2003 and 2008 and use the observed trends to project cancer incidence until 2018. Methods: Using secondary data with a cumulative caseload of 45,753 patients from the National Cancer Registry database of the Ministry of Public Health in Lebanon, we estimated sex- and site- specific incidence of cancer for each year of the six-year period between 2003 and 2008. Logarithmic regressions were fitted to estimate the cancer incidence for the forecast years until 2018. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, males and females presented with an overall 4.5% and 5.4% annual increase, respectively. Significant increases were observed for cancers of the liver and prostate among males, and for cancers of the liver, thyroid, and corpus uteri among females. By 2018, incidence rates were projected to approach 296.0 and 339.5 cases per 100,000 for males and females, respectively. The most common five types of cancer are expected to be prostate, bladder, lung, non-Hodgkin, and colon among males; and breast, ovarian, non-Hodgkin, lung, and colon among females. Conclusion: The increased availability of screening programs and a growing smoking epidemic, most notably in women, are the most likely explanations behind the increased cancer incidence in the past decade. An aging population and higher proportion of older people suggest further increases in the cancer caseload in the future. The health care system in Lebanon will be required to adapt to the growing burden of cancer in our population.


Quality comparison of electronic versus paper death certificates in France, 2010
Background: Electronic death certification was established in France in 2007. A methodology based on intrinsic characteristics of death certificates was designed to compare the quality of electronic versus paper death certificates. Methods: All death certificates from the 2010 French mortality database were included. Three specific quality indicators were considered: (i) amount of information, measured by the number of causes of death coded on the death certificate; (ii) intrinsic consistency, explored by application of the International Classification of Disease (ICD) General Principle, using an international automatic coding system (Iris); (iii) imprecision, measured by proportion of death certificates where the selected underlying cause of death was imprecise. Multivariate models were considered: a truncated Poisson model for indicator (i) and binomial models for indicators (ii) and (iii). Adjustment variables were age, gender, and cause, place, and region of death. Results: 533,977death certificates were analyzed. After adjustment, electronic death certificates contained 19% [17%-20%] more codes than paper death certificates for people deceased under 65 years, and 12% [11%-13%] more codes for people deceased over 65 years. Regarding deceased under and over 65 respectively, the ICD General Principle could be applied 2% [0%-4%] and 6% [5%-7%] more to electronic than to paper death certificates. The proportion of imprecise death certificates was 51% [46%-56%] lower for electronic than for paper death certificates. Conclusion: The method proposed to evaluate the quality of death certificates is easily reproducible in countries using an automatic coding system. According to our criteria, electronic death certificates are better completed than paper death certificates. The transition to electronic death certificates is positive in many aspects and should be promoted.


Estimates of home and leisure injuries treated in emergency departments in the adult population living in metropolitan France: a model-assisted approach
Background: Home and leisure injuries (HLIs) are currently a major public health concern, because of their frequency, associated consequences, and considerable medical costs. As in many other countries in Europe, in France the population coverage of the surveillance system of HLIs is low. In this study, a model-assisted approach is developed to estimate the incidence rates of HLIs in adults treated in emergency departments (EDs) in metropolitan France between 2004 and 2008. Methods: Using a sample of the hospitals participating in the French ED-based surveillance system, a generalized linear mixed model was applied, which describes the relationship between the numbers of ED visits for HLIs and the sex and age of the patients on the basis of the number of injury-related stays recorded by the hospitals. Statistics on hospital stays were provided by the French hospital discharge databases in the participating hospitals. The same statistics were available at the national level, which made it possible to extrapolate national incidence estimates. Results: Over the 2004–2008 period, the estimated incidence rate of HLIs age-standardized on the European population aged 15 years and over was 48.7 per 1,000 person-years (95% confidence interval: 39.4-58.0), and displayed little variability over time. This rate corresponded to an average of 2.5 million emergency hospital visits each year due to an HLI in people aged over 15 in France. Conclusions: The method made it possible to use medico-administrative datasets available nationwide to provide informative estimates despite the small number of participating EDs. The consequences and costs generated by hospital emergency visits can sometimes be onerous, and these estimated rates confirm the scale of the problem and the need to continue investing in preventive actions.