WORLD HOSPITAL DIRECTORY
| More

WORLD HOSPITAL DIRECTORY is the one and only largest database of hospitals around the world. There are over 35,000 plus records of hospitals across globe

WORLD HOSPITAL DIRECTORY has the World's largest online database of general, multispeciality, eye, dental, children, maternity, cardiac care, orthopedic, nephrology, neurology, diabetic, psychiatric, cancer, ENT, hospice, Rehabilitation, alternate medicine, veterinary hospitals across globe. Discover the complete list of hospitals available in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, rest of the world and online.


Country:
Subcontinent:
Continent:
Zipcode:
Category:
Show Listings:
Keyword:
 


1CEMIC
CEMIC
Category: General Hospitals
Argentina
South America, America
2Croydon Hospital (Tablelands HSD)
Croydon Hospital (Tablelands HSD)
Category: Mulispeciality Hospitals
Australia
Australia and New Zealand, Oceanic
3Regionaal Hospital Sint-Maria
Regionaal Hospital Sint-Maria
Category: Mulispeciality Hospitals
Belgium
Western Europe, Europe
4Bairro Passo D'areia Farmaconte Dist. Produtos Hospitalares Ltda.
Bairro Passo D'areia Farmaconte Dist. Produtos Hospitalares Ltda.
Category: Mulispeciality Hospitals
Brazil
South America, America
5BCIT - Technology Centre, Health Technology Research Group
BCIT - Technology Centre, Health Technology Research Group
Category: General Hospitals
Canada
North America, America

1.
Why Our Healthcare System Isnt Healthy
Why Our Healthcare System Isnt HealthyMost people are well aware that an estimated 45 million Americans currently do not have healthcare, but is the crisis simply the lack
More >>
2.
Stopping Hospital Infections
Stopping Hospital InfectionsEach year hospitals end up killing twice as many people than automobiles, some 90,000 deaths in the United States. It is not from malpractice, i
More >>
3.
Protect Yourself Against the Flu Vaccine!
Protect Yourself Against the Flu Vaccine!<br />
The vaccine industry insists that their vaccines against the flu serve as the key to a healthy winter. Although there has
More >>
4.
Chinese Medicine
Chinese MedicineChinese Medicine, over 2000 years old, is an ancient form of medicine. Consisting of acupuncture, moxibustion (moxibustion - using material made up of
More >>
5.
Medical Billing Specialist
Medical Billing SpecialistAs Pres. Bush was touring the Midwest, shortly before he was re-elected as President, and even after, he spoke of medical reform centering on
More >>
6.
Nasonex And You: Breathe Easy, Not Sneezy
Nasonex And You: Breathe EasyWhile everybody else is wandering around enjoying the spring weather, are you hiding out in your hermetically-sealed house? Do you dread the star
More >>
7.
Chronic Headaches and Pain Often Can Be Eliminated By A Special Dentist
Chronic Headaches Often Can Be Eliminated By A Special DentistDENVER ? Sometimes as Freud once said a good cigar is just a smoke. A headache, on the other hand, occas
More >>
8.
Physicians, Chiropractors and Physical Therapist Agree on a New Treatment for Low Back Pain
New Treatment for Low Back Pain<br />
One of the most prevalent and difficult health conditions to treat in the physical medicine is low back pain. The difficulty in tre
More >>
9.
Web Therapy: Enhancing Patient Communication with Web Access
Web Therapy: Enhancing Patient Communication with Web AccessAccording to Jennifer Lyons' chart, she's just a bad slip and fall who's lucky enough to be on her way to a full
More >>
10.
Increasing Patient Care and Reducing Liability in Seven Simple Steps
Increasing Patient Care and Reducing Liability in Seven Simple StepsWhen an unconscious patient arrives in the ED, every hospital agrees that timely next of kin notificat
More >>
11.
Cetyl Myristoleate Seperating Fact From Fiction
Cetyl Myristoleate Seperating Fact From FictionI am a strong believer in Cetyl Myristoleate for the treatment of arthritis. For the last three years I have been res
More >>
12.
Medical Tests: What Does a Normal Range Mean?
Medical Tests: What Does a Normal Range Mean?We have a marvelous array of medical tests available to us. Many of them-typically blood-tests-even come with results expressed
More >>
13.
CT and MRI Scans in Neurological Practice
CT and MRI Scans in Neurological Practice

Before computed tomographic (CT) scans became available in the 1970s, there was no good method for imaging the brain. The a
More >>
14.
Alcohol Rehabilitation Centers - Take An Informed Decision
Alcohol Rehabilitation Centers - Take An Informed DecisionAlcohol rehabilitation centers in the United States offer a wide range of treatment programmes for your recovery f
More >>
15.
Contact Lenses and Eye Glasses
Contact Lenses and Eye GlassesHow is Your Vision?
Notice friends getting contact lenses and pulling out eye glasses?

"What do you recommend?"

More >>
16.
Death by Fluoride
Death by FluorideA wee bit of fluoride makes teeth and dentists happy, we're told. Dr. Happy Tooth's smiley face turns into a frown when his favorite decay buster is busted
More >>
17.
10 Steps To Detoxification
10 Steps To DetoxificationTechnology. We live in a grand time of technological development. Computers, the Internet, cell phones, digital cameras and DVDs. But the human body h
More >>
18.
New Surgical Treatment Options for Hernias
New Surgical Treatment Options for HerniasHernia repair is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide. In fact, there are over 600,000 hernia repa
More >>
19.
Arthritis Pain Relief : FAQ
Arthritis Pain Relief : FAQA great place to begin taking charge of you arthritis pain relief and prevention planning is by making an appointment with your healthc
More >>
20.
A Surgical Robot Fixes Heart in Brazil
a Surgical Robot Fixes Heart in BrazilBrazilian surgeons used a multi-armed robot to repair a hole in a woman's heart in the first operation of its kind in Latin Americ
More >>
21.
Root Canal Therapy:FAQ
Root Canal Therapy:FAQOverview

A diseased or injured nerve use to mean that you were likely to lose a tooth. This is no longer the case thanks to root
More >>
22.
ADHD - Are there Treatment Options?
ADHD - Are there Treatment Options?As an ADD coach I am often asked about the treatment options available for Attention Deficit Disorder. Generally when someone says "ADD" the f
More >>
23.
7 Tips to Keep Your Fluid Down on Dialysis
7 Tips to Keep Your Fluid Down on DialysisAs any dialysis patient will tell you, keeping your fluid gain between dialysis sessions in check is not only important to your lon
More >>
24.
Testosterone Therapy in XXI Century
Testosterone Therapy in XXI CenturyNowadays many people are familiar with the appellation of "low testosterone level". What does it mean? It mean that male body p
More >>
25.
Stem Cell Research
Stem Cell ResearchHow To Buy Your Way Out Of An Early Death From An Incurable Disease.

How?... With private stem cell research, of course!?Stem cell research
More >>
1.
Maharashtra woos medical tourists
Maharashtra woos medical touristsMany people from the developed world come to India for the rejuvenation promised by yoga and ayurvedic massage, but few consider it a de
More >>
2.
Medical tourism: Need surgery, will travel
Maharashtra woos medical touristsA worldwide market

What's called medical tourism – patients going to a different country for either urgent or elective
More >>
3.
Medical Tourism is Becoming a Huge Industry in India
Diatance LearningMany types of medical treatment in India cost a fraction of what they do in the United States and other Western nations, and citizens from these c
More >>
4.
Medical tourism set to take off in a big way
Medical tourism set to take off in a big wayWith world class healthcare professionals, nursing care and treatment cost almost one-sixth of that in the developed
More >>
5.
India eyeing share in medical tourism pie
India eyeing share in medical tourism pie A NICE blend of top-class medical expertise at attractive prices is helping a growing number of Indian corporate hospitals lure forei
More >>
6.
Are we ready for medical tourism?
Are we ready for medical tourism? The private healthcare industry is quietly facilitating a revolution to enable India to emerge as a health destination. Yet there are the
More >>
7.
Is medical tourism worth the risk?
Is medical tourism worth the risk?Thousands of Britons are heading abroad for cut-price treatment. We investigate the health tourism boom and asks if the benefits o
More >>
8.
Package holiday surgery to beat NHS queue
Package holiday surgery to beat NHS queueA holiday firm is offering 'sun and surgery' package deals to India for patients tired of waiting for the NHS.

Th
More >>
9.
Choosing the right weight loss surgery abroad
Choosing the right weight loss surgery abroadThe reluctance of public healthcare systems and health insurers to fund weight loss surgery means that more and more people are
More >>
10.
The forgotten medical tourism destination
The forgotten medical tourism destinationAn article by medical tourism specialist, Ian Youngman, on one of the world’s leading destinations for medical travelers which seems
More >>
11.
Why medical tourism needs facilitators
Why medical tourism needs facilitatorsFollowing our recent article on "How can patients judge quality in medical tourism?", Caroline Ratner spoke to Mike Silford, who run
More >>
12.
How can patients judge quality in medical tourism?
How can patients judge quality in medical tourism?There's much discussion and hype around the medical tourism world about “quality”. Every hospital, clinic, healthcar
More >>
13.
The importance of social media and the web in medical tourism
The importance of social media and the web in medical tourismMore than most other industries, medical tourism agencies and international patient departments rely heavily on t
More >>
14.
Medical Tourism Destinations: Places That Top The Charts
Medical Tourism Destinations: Places That Top The ChartsMedical tourism is a popular trend among people in the US nowadays. Many Americans are moving abroad to get tr
More >>
15.
Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery Option In Malaysia
Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery Option In MalaysiaMedical Tourism Malaysia is growing at an exponential growth factor. Its enjoying medical tourist from UK, Australia, New Zealand
More >>
16.
Samitivej Medical Tourism, A Lucrative Business
Samitivej Medical Tourism, A Lucrative BusinessSamitivej Wins 2 Prestigious HMA Awards 2008 Path to Being the Largest Medical Tourism

Samitivej, a leading pri
More >>
17.
Jordan pushes medical tourism industry
Jordan pushes medical tourism industryAfter establishing itself as a popular destination for medical care among Arabs in the Middle East, Jordan is now looking to attract more
More >>
18.
Some Frequently Asked Questions about Medical Tourism
Some Frequently Asked Questions about Medical TourismWhat is the quality of care that I can expect? Most of the healthcare centers abroad such as hospitals clinics and diagnostic
More >>
19.
Infertility Treatment in India
Infertility Treatment in IndiaInfertility is the inability to conceive a child by natural means. When a couple finds it difficult to conceive naturally, medication and spe
More >>
20.
Medical Tourism Thailand
Medical Tourism ThailandThailand has been a popular holiday destination of the East which is now a popular medical tourism destination as well. The Thai medical service is on
More >>
21.
Medical Tourism India
Medical Tourism IndiaA medical tourist in India can get the best of both worlds- excellent medical service from experts in the field of medicine and a splendid experience of a
More >>
22.
Digitizing Medical Documents
Digitizing Medical DocumentsIt is a common fact that hospitals and doctors need a patient’s detailed medical history before treating them. But when you have travele
More >>
23.
Roux-en-gastric bypass in India: An Overview
Roux-en-gastric bypass in India: An OverviewRoux-en-gastric bypass in India is very economical and affordable. Low cost but quality treatment attracts many patients of a
More >>
24.
Need a dentist? Come to Croatia
Need a dentist? Come to Croatia



vaporizers



Croatia has decided to take
More >>
25.
India offers hope for those too sick to wait
India offers hope for those too sick to waitEmerging into the teeming chaos of people, cows and honking vehicles outside Bangalore airport, retired teacher John Stauffer wonde
More >>




BMC Dermatology reviewer acknowledgement, 2014
Contributing reviewerThe editors of BMC Dermatology would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed their time to the journal in Volume 14 (2014).


Validation of the global resource of eczema trials (GREAT database)
Background: Eczema (syn. Atopic Eczema or Atopic Dermatitis) is a chronic, relapsing, itchy skin condition which probably results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The Global Resource of EczemA Trials (GREAT) is a collection of records of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) for eczema treatment produced from a highly sensitive search of six reference databases. We sought to assess the sensitivity of the GREAT database as a tool to save future researchers repeating extensive bibliographic searches. Methods: All Cochrane systematic review on treatments for eczema and five non-Cochrane systematic reviews on eczema were identified as a reference set to assess the utility of the GREAT database in identifying randomised controlled trials (RCTs). RCTs included in the systematic reviews were checked for inclusion in the GREAT database by two independent authors. A third author resolved any disagreements. Results: Five Cochrane and six non-Cochrane systematic reviews containing a total of 105 RCTs of eczema treatments were included. Of these, 95 fitted the inclusion criteria for the GREAT database and 88 were published from 2000 onwards. Of the 88 eligible studies, 92% were found in the GREAT database. Seven trials were not included in the GREAT database - two of these were reported within a review paper and one as an abstract with no trial results. Conclusions: The sensitivity of the GREAT database for trials from 2000 onwards was high (75/88 trials, 94%). Sensitivity for the period prior to 2000 was less sensitive, due to differences in how the trials were identified prior to this time.‘Dual’ filtering for new records has recently become part of the GREAT database methodology and should further improve the sensitivity of the database in time. The GREAT database can be considered as a primary source for future systematic reviews including randomised controlled trials of eczema treatments, but searches should be supplemented by checking reference lists for eligible trials, searching trial registries and contacting pharmaceutical companies for unpublished studies.


BMC Dermatology reviewer acknowledgement 2014
Contributing reviewersThe editors of BMC Dermatology would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 14 (2014).


Photoallergic reaction in a patient receiving vandetanib for metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma: a case report
Background: Novel targeted agents have been increasingly developed and tested in clinical trials over the past 5–10 years, many with unknown and unanticipated side effects. We describe here a case of a patient with a history of metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma that we believe developed vandetanib–associated photoallergic dermatitis while enrolled on a phase 1 clinical trial.Case presentationA 51-year-old Caucasian female with poorly differentiated, metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma presented with a cutaneous eruption that developed over 3 to 4 days while treated on phase 1 clinical trial with vandetanib-based therapy. Given the concern for photoallergic dermatitis, vandetanib was discontinued and supportive care provided including topical and oral steroid administration. Her cutaneous eruption improved and she was successfully re-challenged with vandetanib. Conclusion: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as typo-vandetinib, with various therapeutic targets have come to the forefront of oncologic therapy in recent years. It is important to have a better understanding of the side effect profile and management in order to anticipate adverse events and maintain patient safety in future clinical trials.


Exploring the association between Morgellons disease and Lyme disease: identification of Borrelia burgdorferi in Morgellons disease patients
Background: Morgellons disease (MD) is a complex skin disorder characterized by ulcerating lesions that have protruding or embedded filaments. Many clinicians refer to this condition as delusional parasitosis or delusional infestation and consider the filaments to be introduced textile fibers. In contrast, recent studies indicate that MD is a true somatic illness associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are keratin and collagen in composition and that they result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the skin. Previously, spirochetes have been detected in the dermatological specimens from four MD patients, thus providing evidence of an infectious process.Methods & ResultsBased on culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and molecular testing, we present corroborating evidence of spirochetal infection in a larger group of 25 MD patients. Irrespective of Lyme serological reactivity, all patients in our study group demonstrated histological evidence of epithelial spirochetal infection. Strength of evidence based on other testing varied among patients. Spirochetes identified as Borrelia strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or in-situ DNA hybridization were detected in 24/25 of our study patients. Skin cultures containing Borrelia spirochetes were obtained from four patients, thus demonstrating that the organisms present in dermatological specimens were viable. Spirochetes identified by PCR as Borrelia burgdorferi were cultured from blood in seven patients and from vaginal secretions in three patients, demonstrating systemic infection. Based on these observations, a clinical classification system for MD is proposed. Conclusions: Our study using multiple detection methods confirms that MD is a true somatic illness associated with Borrelia spirochetes that cause Lyme disease. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal treatment for this spirochete-associated dermopathy.


Digital photography in skin cancer screening by mobile units in remote areas of Brazil
Background: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is one of the most common neoplasms in the world. Despite the low mortality rates, NMSC can still cause severe sequelae when diagnosed at advanced stages. Malignant melanoma, the third most common type of skin cancer, has more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Teledermatology provides a new tool for monitoring skin cancer, especially in countries with a large area and unequal population distribution.This study sought to evaluate the performance of digital photography in skin cancer diagnosis in remote areas of Brazil. Methods: A physician in a Mobile Prevention Unit (MPU) took four hundred sixteen digital images of suspicious lesions between April 2010 and July 2011. All of the photographs were electronically sent to two oncologists at Barretos Cancer Hospital who blindly evaluated the images and provided a diagnosis (benign or malignant). The absolute agreement rates between the diagnoses made by direct visual inspection (by the MPU physician) and through the use of digital imaging (by the two oncologists) were calculated. The oncologists’ accuracy in predicting skin cancer using digital imaging was assessed by means of overall accuracy (correct classification rate), sensitivity, specificity and predictive value (positive and negative). A skin biopsy was considered the gold standard. Results: Oncologist #1 classified 59 lesions as benign with the digital images, while oncologist #2 classified 27 lesions as benign using the same images. The absolute agreement rates with direct visual inspection were 85.8% for oncologist #1 (95% CI: 77.1-95.2) and 93.5% for oncologist #2 (95% CI: 84.5-100.0). The overall accuracy of the two oncologists did not differ significantly. Conclusions: Given the high sensitivity and PPV, Teledermatology seems to be a suitable tool for skin cancer screening by MPU in remote areas of Brazil.


Innate lymphoid cells and the skin
Innate lymphoid cells are an emerging family of effector cells that contribute to lymphoid organogenesis, metabolism, tissue remodelling and protection against infections. They maintain homeostatic immunity at barrier surfaces such as lung, skin and gut (Nature 464:1367–1371, 2010, Nat Rev Immunol 13: 145–149, 2013). Several human and mouse studies suggest a role for innate lymphoid cells in inflammatory skin conditions including atopic eczema and psoriasis. Here we review the innate lymphoid cell family and discuss their function in the skin and during inflammation.


Association of variation in the LAMA3 gene, encoding the alpha-chain of laminin 5, with atopic dermatitis in a German case¿control cohort
Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder caused by complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Besides mutations in the filaggrin gene, leading to impaired skin barrier function, variation in genes encoding additional skin proteins has been suggested to contribute to disease risk. Laminin 5, playing an important role in skin integrity, is composed of three subunits encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes in which biallelic mutations cause epidermolysis bullosa junctionalis. We aimed at evaluating the role of variation in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes for AD pathogenesis. Methods: 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in the three genes in a German AD case–control cohort comprising 470 unrelated AD patients and 320 non-atopic controls by means of restriction enzyme digestion. Allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using chi-square testing and the Haploview software. Results: Several SNPs in the LAMA3 gene showed significant association with AD in our cohort (p <0.01), while we did not detect association with variations in the LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes. Haplotype analysis additionally revealed several significantly associated haplotypes in the LAMA3 gene. Due to extensive linkage disequilibrium, though, we were not able to further differentiate the specific disease causing variation(s) in this region. Conclusions: We established the LAMA3 gene as novel potential susceptibility gene for AD. Additional studies in independent cohorts are needed to replicate these results.


Testing the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention for adults with venous leg ulcers: protocol of a randomised controlled trial
Background: Exercise and adequate self-management capacity may be important strategies in the management of venous leg ulcers. However, it remains unclear if exercise improves the healing rates of venous leg ulcers and if a self-management exercise program based on self-efficacy theory is well adhered to.Method/designThis is a randomised controlled in adults with venous leg ulcers to determine the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention. Participants with venous leg ulcers are recruited from 3 clinical sites in Australia. After collection of baseline data, participants are randomised to either an intervention group or control group. The control group receive usual care, as recommended by evidence based guidelines. The intervention group receive an individualised program of calf muscle exercises and walking. The twelve week exercise program integrates multiple elements, including up to six telephone delivered behavioural coaching and goal setting sessions, supported by written materials, a pedometer and two follow-up booster calls if required. Participants are encouraged to seek social support among their friends, self-monitor their weekly steps and lower limb exercises. The control group are supported by a generic information sheet that the intervention group also receive encouraging lower limb exercises, a pedometer for self-management and phone calls at the same time points as the intervention group. The primary outcome is the healing rates of venous leg ulcers which are assessed at fortnightly clinic appointments. Secondary outcomes, assessed at baseline and 12 weeks: functional ability (range of ankle motion and Tinetti gait and balance score), quality of life and self-management scores.DiscussionThis study seeks to address a significant gap in current wound management practice by providing evidence for the effectiveness of a home-based exercise program for adults with venous leg ulcers. Theory-driven, evidence-based strategies that can improve an individual’s exercise self-efficacy and self-management capacity could have a significant impact in improving the management of people with venous leg ulcers. Information gained from this study will provide much needed information on management of this chronic disease to promote health and independence in this population.Trial registrationAustralian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000475842.


Tomotherapy concomitant with cetuximab, followed by cetuximab as single-agent therapy for unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the skin: a case report
Background: Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most frequency of all skin tumors. Incidence of SCC has risen significantly due to an increased sun exposure and the number of immunodeficient patients. Cutaneous SCC is characterized by high Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression with low frequency of RAS mutations. Generally, locoregional surgery is curative and systemic therapy is not indicated. We evaluated the activity and toxicity profile of tomotherapy concomitant with Cetuximab, followed by Cetuximab as single agent therapy in a patient affected by unresectable, locally advanced cutaneous SCC.Case presentationAt our institution, on March 2012 we treated a 45 years-old patient affected by locally advanced, unresectable G1 SCC of the lumbar region. At our first observation, the patient was asthenic, with severe pain and functional limitations. There was also a superinfection due to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa resistant to antibiotics, and a G3 anemia secondary to the bleeding lesion. ECOG Performance Status was 2. Tomotherapy has been performed concomitant with the Cetuximab (400 mg/m2, followed by weekly doses of 250 mg/m2) at the total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy/fx), followed by Cetuximab monotherapy.The lesion reduced progressively until disappear even after the suspension of the treatment and the patient achieved complete response. Toxicity resulted in G1 cutaneous rash and G2 toxicity to the nails, appeared after 5 months of treatment, typical toxicity profile of the anti-EGFR therapies. After one month of therapy the Pseudomonas Aeruginosa superinfection totally disappeared. Quality of life resulted significantly improved with reduction until discontinuation of the anti-pain drugs, and progressive increase of the hemoglobin levels. At follow up of 15 months there was no evidence of active disease and the ECOG Performance Status was 0 (zero). Conclusion: The treatment was effective and feasible. Considering these excellent results, further studies about concomitant tomotherapy with Cetuximab for advanced/inoperable SCC of the skin are needed.